Last edited by Nak
Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

2 edition of Institutional efficiency, monitoring costs, and the investment share of FDI found in the catalog.

Institutional efficiency, monitoring costs, and the investment share of FDI

Joshua Aizenman

Institutional efficiency, monitoring costs, and the investment share of FDI

by Joshua Aizenman

  • 308 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Investments, Foreign -- Developing countries -- Mathematical models.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementJoshua Aizenman, Mark M. Spiegel.
    SeriesNBER working paper series -- no. 9324, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 9324.
    ContributionsSpiegel, Mark., National Bureau of Economic Research.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination27 p. :
    Number of Pages27
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22445939M

    Foreign direct investment (FDI) is a major driver of globalisation. As investment patterns of multinational enterprises become more and more complex, reliable and internationally comparable, FDI statistics are necessary for sound decision making. The OECD Benchmark Definition of Foreign Direct Investment sets the world standard for FDI. infrastructure have the most influence on foreign direct investment decision-making. At the same time recent studies show that high real average wages have a negative impact on FDI flows, although labor quality is also found to be very important.3 Special consideration should be given to the effects of tax incentives for FDI flows. Inasmuch.

    FDI. 1) General Information About FDI. Foreign direct investment (FDI) can be defined by saying: If an investor takes place in far from their home country with purchasing a firm in the landlord country’s border. According to “The Organization of Economic Corporation and Development (OECD)”, If a foreign investor has more the ten percent of the local company, this means that the foreign. Foreign direct investment, institutions and economic growth: threshold effect Trojette Ines1 Abstract: This paper examines whether the effect of foreign direct investment on economic growth is dependent upon the institutional level for the MENA region divided into middle (oil importer) and high-income countries (oil exporter).

      Foreign direct investment (FDI) means companies purchase capital and invest in a foreign country. For example, if a US multinational, such as Nike built a factory for making trainers in Pakistan; this would count as foreign direct investment. In summary, the main factors that affect foreign direct investment are. Leadership commitment, institutional autonomy and staff engagement are found to be among the key enablers of efficiency, whereas institutional reluctance to change, financial constraints for investment into efficiency programmes (e.g. technology and staff training) as well as concerns over quality are among the most common barriers.


Share this book
You might also like
World drama from Æschylus to Anouilh

World drama from Æschylus to Anouilh

Visitors Guide, Portugal (World Traveller)

Visitors Guide, Portugal (World Traveller)

Cultural Imperialism- Essays (INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAM IN THE HUMANITIES, CULTURAL IMPERIALISM INSTRUCTORS COLLECTIVE)

Cultural Imperialism- Essays (INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAM IN THE HUMANITIES, CULTURAL IMPERIALISM INSTRUCTORS COLLECTIVE)

Jaguar E-type

Jaguar E-type

Institute for Human Rights and Freedom

Institute for Human Rights and Freedom

John Walker

John Walker

Discrimination against women

Discrimination against women

Social psychology of education

Social psychology of education

Polish Constitution of the third of May

Polish Constitution of the third of May

Descendants of Otto Henrich Wilhelm Brinkman

Descendants of Otto Henrich Wilhelm Brinkman

Are You Going to Heaven?

Are You Going to Heaven?

Water Resource Research Grant Program project descriptions, fiscal year 1986

Water Resource Research Grant Program project descriptions, fiscal year 1986

Clicker training for dogs

Clicker training for dogs

COLDWATER CREEK INC.

COLDWATER CREEK INC.

Kilimanjaro

Kilimanjaro

The Hspt Coach Reading

The Hspt Coach Reading

Born for the mat

Born for the mat

Down country

Down country

Institutional efficiency, monitoring costs, and the investment share of FDI by Joshua Aizenman Download PDF EPUB FB2

Institutional Efficiency, Monitoring Costs, and the Investment Share of FDI Joshua Aizenman and Mark M. Spiegel* Abstract This paper models and tests the implications of institutional efficiency on the pattern of Institutional efficiency direct investment (FDI).

We posit that domestic agents have a comparative. Request PDF | Institutional Efficiency, Monitoring Costs, and the Investment Share of FDI | During the nineties, Europe became a major recipient of FDIs but Italian regions have been largely.

Request PDF | On Mar 1,Joshua Aizenman and others published Institutional Efficiency, Monitoring Costs, and the Investment Share of FDI | Find, read and cite all. "Institutional Efficiency, Monitoring Costs, and the Investment Share of FDI," NBER Working PapersNational Bureau of Economic Research, Institutional efficiency.

Joshua Aizenman & Mark M. Spiegel, "Institutional efficiency, monitoring costs, and the investment share of FDI," Working Paper SeriesFederal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, revised Institutional Efficiency, Monitoring Costs and the Investment Share of FDI.

Institutional Efficiency, Monitoring Costs and the Investment Share of FDI Review of International Economics, Vol. 14, No. 4, pp.September Number of pages: 15 Posted: 16 Aug We then test this prediction, comparing institutional efficiency levels for a large cross‐section of countries in to subsequent FDI flows through the period of –99, finding that institutional efficiency is positively associated with the ratio of subsequent foreign direct investment flows to both gross fixed capital formation and to.

We compare institutional efficiency levels for a large cross section of countries in to subsequent FDI flows from to We find that institutional efficiency is positively associated with the ratio of subsequent foreign direct investment flows to both gross fixed capital formation and to private investment.

BibTeX @MISC{Aizenman02givento, author = {Joshua Aizenman and Mark M. Spiegel and Joshua Aizenman and Mark M. Spiegel}, title = {given to the source.

Institutional Efficiency, Monitoring Costs, and the Investment Share of FDI}, year = {}}. Aizenman, J. and M. Spiegel (), “Institutional Efficiency, Monitoring Costs, and the Investment Share of FDI,” Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco Working Paper – Alam, S.

(), “ Some Economic Costs of Corruption in LDC's,” Journal of Development Studies, Vol. 89– Additional Physical Format: Online version: Aizenman, Joshua. Institutional effiency, monitoring costs, and the investment share of FDI. Cambridge, Mass.: National. The influence of institutional quality on the economic environment has been long acknowledged by researchers, notably as a main driver of foreign direct investment (FDI).

Despite the abundant literature, the majority of papers analyze advanced and emerging economies either separately or without making a distinction between them. Institutional Efficiency, Monitoring Costs, and the Investment Share of FDI Joshua Aizenman, Mark M.

Spiegel. NBER Working Paper No. Issued in November NBER Program(s):International Trade and Investment This paper models and tests the implications of costly enforcement of property rights on the pattern of foreign direct investment (FDI).Cited by: Daude and Stein () proposed two channels through which poor institutional quality could deter FDI inflows.

They said that poor institutions could act like a tax, therefore, being a cost to FDI investors. Poor institutional quality could also increase the uncertainty associated with all types of investment, including FDI.

The authors analyzed. Institutional Efficiency, Monitoring Costs, and the Investment Share of FDI Joshua Aizenman and Mark M.

Spiegel NBER Working Paper No. November JEL No. F21, F23, J31, P14 ABSTRACT This paper models and tests the implications of costly enforcement of property rights on the pattern of foreign direct investment (FDI). This study investigates the impact of institutional quality on Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) inflows using panel data for low, lower-middle, upper-middle and high-income countries for the sample period of – using the system Generalized Method of Moments (GMM).

The empirical results confirm that institutional quality has a positive impact on FDI in all group of countries. This report examines the system of monitoring and evaluating foreign direct investment (FDI) in Kazakhstan and proposes a more comprehensive and unified approach for the future.

Monitoring and evaluation are important in order to manage FDI attraction support and activities. Introduction.

This publication is intended to supplement the CSO’s current publications on Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in Ireland and explain any differences found between FDI figures published by the CSO or other international organisations. The CSO publishes values of FDI using two internationally agreed methods.

This book consists of detailed case studies of foreign direct investment (FDI) in China, India, Ireland, Malaysia, Mexico and Sub-Saharan Africa, providing a critical review of the determinants and impact of FDI on growth and development, employment, tech.

In this study, we examined the effect of institutional distance of foreign direct investment (FDI) flowing into a host country by using international M&A data for US firms.

We analyzed a vast dataset consisting of 7, cases of international M&A by US firms that invested in 38 countries from through. and institutional factors such as judicial independence and labor market flexibility. Finally, we find that the effect of these factors often differs between advanced and emerging economies.

JEL Classification Numbers: F21, F23 Keywords: Foreign direct investment, determinants, institutional development, international finance.economy – a dynamic akin to Thelen et al.’s () concept of ‘institutional drift’ - can have equally important effects on common (mis-)understandings in international economic affairs.

As the chapter shows, the theoretical concept of FDI that underlies the collection of. Many governments can be considered pragmatic nationalists when it comes to FDI. Accordingly, their policy is shaped by a consideration of the costs and benefits of FDI.

Here we explore the benefits and costs of FDI, first from the perspective of a host country and then from a perspective of the home country.

Host Country+ Read More.